Springboro residents appeal proposed rezoning of neighboring land


Residents of a local golf-course community appealed to the Springboro City Council on Thursday to reconsider the proposed rezoning of neighboring land for residential development.

The residents of the 212-home Heatherwoode community spoke during a public hearing on rezoning of 2.3 acres at 1360 S. Main St., just north of the entrance to the community, featuring the city-owned golf course.

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The property owners, the Daniel Family Trust, are seeking rezoning to allow the development of a 7-lot subdivision at a density, following the dedication of 0.22 acres of right-of-way along South Main Street, of 3.29 units per acre.

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Streets on each side of the proposed development have seven homes backing onto the property “no more and no less than we request,” said Rebecca Geiger, representative for the property owners.

Two councilmembers, Carol Moore and Becky Iverson, live in the development but did not comment.

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The Heatherwoode Homeowners Association presented more than 100 signatures on petitions presented to the council at the public hearing.

Residents are concerned about the effect on their property values, and traffic and safety at rush hours and when school lets out across Ohio 741, Main Street in Springboro, at the junior high school.

Joe Westendorf, a Heatherwoode resident, said another road would have to be built for the development because the property owners declined to join the Heatherwoode community and be accessed by existing roads in the community.

“They had an opportunity,” he said. “So now we’re going to have one more road.”


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Association President Shawn Hunter said he discovered the proposed rezoning late last month when driving to the Christmas In Springboro festival.

“We really exist to preserve the community. Part of that is preserving the property values,” Hunter said.

City Manager Chris Pozzuto said it was uncertain how the development would affect property values.

“I can say generally, however, that historically, through many developments around the town, property values in Springboro have always increased over time,” he said before the meeting.

Residents are also concerned about the effect on tree lines and creeks shared by the developments.

Mayor John Agenbroad, who lives on South Main across the street from Heatherwoode, recused himself from the issue and left the meeting during the public hearing.

“I am one of the property members affected. I will not be involved whatsoever,” Agenbroad said during a work session before Thursday’s public hearing.

Vice Mayor Jim Chmiel said the council wasn’t going to vote on the rezoning until the Jan. 4 meeting.








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